Where to start with this book, I guess at the beginning.  At the beginning, I wasn’t a big fan.  It felt slow and almost too real.  Like I was really back in high school and seriously no one wants that.  But the more pages I turned, the more I had to read.

The plot is slow to start, but then just picks up speed like a boulder down a mountain.  The book is divided into three main parts, one for each main character.  It was at the start of part two that I was a complete and total goner and I knew it.  While reading part two I was just sure that it would be my favorite.  Then I got to part three and boy oh boy are you in for a treat.

The basic plot line of the book is that a teenage boy buys this beat up, rust bucket of a Plymouth and is hell bent on restoring her.  The only problem is, the more he loves her the more she comes alive.  I am not speaking metaphorically here.  The car starts to repair herself, and then she does so much more.  The mystery is, how will she be stopped?

One of the creepiest sections of the book for me was when two of the characters have a fit about how Arnie, that is the teenage boy mentioned earlier, calls the car “her” and never “it”.  Well you see, I never call my car it, she is Zeva and she is “her” to me.  After reading that part, I couldn’t talk about my own car without getting chills wondering if she could come alive one day too.  Rationally I knew it would never happen, but I read after dark a lot and my imagination gets the best of me some times.

Stephen King is an author I hate to love.  He can make the simplest things extraordinarily creepy.  He can twist you into knots in a single sentence.  I still haven’t forgiven him for It, I had nightmares for weeks.  With Christine, he does not disappoint.  The book has a marvelous story arch, the plot is superbly arranged, the characters are painfully real, and the suspense will almost kill you.  This book is in my top 100 (hey I read a lot) of books.  I cannot wait now to go get another Stephen King novel and be terrified and tormented in new and unique ways.

Love and there is no happy ending,

Betty

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